We’ve all be there, battling with scale, swearing by our diet, and getting in those extra steps everyday. Yet, a lot of us still find the scale isn’t moving in the direction we were hoping. When making lifestyle changes, there’s a lot of things we tend to overlook.

Here are the top three reasons many people fail to meet their weight loss goals and ways to combat them:

1

You’ve set vague or unrealistic goals. Take into account your body type, height and frame and consider seeking a doctor’s advice for a plan that’s right for you. Now write it down, along with your specific goals. This will keep you on track for slow but steady progress. For example, “I want to lose 10 pounds by April 1,” or “I will eat less processed food starting today.”

2

You haven’t considered your hormones. If you’re doing everything you can—eating well, sleeping, working out—but still not seeing results, it may be worth talking to your doctor. There are a number of hormonal conditions that can affect weight, particularly in women, including Cushing’s syndrome, hypothyroidism and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS).

3

Your lifestyle habits need a makeover. Sleep is critical for weight loss. According to the Harvard School of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, individuals who don’t get enough sleep usually weigh more than those who do. Lack of adequate sleep also puts people at higher risk for chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and depression.

In addition to getting a good night’s sleep, you also need to find the time to exercise. There are plenty of quick and effective workouts available online, such as the New York Times’ popular 7-Minute Workout. Making a few new changes to your diet, even just drinking more water every day or replacing red meat with a leaner meat, can also help.

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No information provided in any recipe and/or other product or service is a substitute for professional medical advice and should not be interpreted as treatment recommendations. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH PROVIDER WITH ANY QUESTIONS REGARDING A MEDICAL CONDITION.

Ladies, don’t be afraid to speak up at your next OB/GYN exam. In fact, some problems that are uncomfortable to talk about could be signs of something much more serious, such as infections, menopause, endometriosis and even cancer.

Here are the top seven questions that women are afraid to ask their OB/GYNs, with the answers that all patients should know:

1

You’ve set vague or unrealistic goals. Take into account your body type, height and frame and consider seeking a doctor’s advice for a plan that’s right for you. Now write it down, along with your specific goals. This will keep you on track for slow but steady progress. For example, “I want to lose 10 pounds by April 1,” or “I will eat less processed food starting today.”

2

You haven’t considered your hormones. If you’re doing everything you can—eating well, sleeping, working out—but still not seeing results, it may be worth talking to your doctor. There are a number of hormonal conditions that can affect weight, particularly in women, including Cushing’s syndrome, hypothyroidism and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS).

3

Your lifestyle habits need a makeover. Sleep is critical for weight loss. According to the Harvard School of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, individuals who don’t get enough sleep usually weigh more than those who do. Lack of adequate sleep also puts people at higher risk for chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and depression.

In addition to getting a good night’s sleep, you also need to find the time to exercise. There are plenty of quick and effective workouts available online, such as the New York Times’ popular 7-Minute Workout. Making a few new changes to your diet, even just drinking more water every day or replacing red meat with a leaner meat, can also help.

Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Copyright indicia (© 2007 – 2017 Baldwin Publishing, Inc.). All rights reserved.

Health eCooking® Trademark indicia (® Health eCooking is a registered trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc.)

No information provided in any recipe and/or other product or service is a substitute for professional medical advice and should not be interpreted as treatment recommendations. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH PROVIDER WITH ANY QUESTIONS REGARDING A MEDICAL CONDITION.