Patients with a significantly high BMI (body mass index) often find that weight loss surgery, also referred to as bariatric surgery, can be a successful solution. This is a medically-supported way for patients to lose excess body weight; so additional health risks are reduced. Sometimes, bariatric patients are referred for weight loss surgery by another specialist, before they can undergo a different procedure.

There are a number of requirements that patients must meet in order to be considered for weight loss surgery. With the patient’s best interest in mind, these requirements were developed to help ensure they will be a successful candidate for the procedure.

In the event that a patient is not approved for bariatric surgery, the Sisters Metabolic Center for Wellness still has resources available for patients who could benefit from medically-supported weight loss. 

 

Understanding the Factors Considered for Weight Loss Surgery 

1

BMI

To be a candidate for weight loss surgery, a patient must have a BMI of 40 or greater, or a BMI over 35 accompanied by an obesity-related illness or physical impairment.

BMI is a value calculated based on your height and weight. You can calculate BMI on your own using this tool provided by the CDC.

2

Related health complications

Patients with a slightly lower BMI may still be considered for surgery if their obesity is affecting other aspects of their health. Related problems could include, but are not limited to, diabetes, heart disease, osteoarthritis, and sleep apnea.

3

Approval from primary care doctor

In an ideal doctor-patient relationship, your primary care provider has a good picture of your overall health. He or she may have referred you to specialists for specific health issues. This is why many insurance companies ask for a primary care doctor’s sign off on a medical weight loss procedure.

This can create a barrier for patients who may not have seen a doctor in recent years, or may not even have one. Our office staff is here to help make sure patients meet their insurance requirements.

4

Smoking cessation

If you’re a smoker, you’ll need to stop using tobacco products — in most cases, for eight weeks before surgery. Quitting prior to surgery sets patients up with a habit they’ll need to maintain for a healthy lifestyle. Tobacco use after surgery can also put unnecessary strain on your “new” stomach.

5

Motivation to make positive changes

Lastly, a successful weight loss journey requires the patient’s own buy-in. No one is expected to tackle their weight loss journey alone. However, this process asks the patient to make a commitment to themselves and their health.

Patients will be asked to follow specific lifestyle modifications leading up to their procedure, in order to prepare their bodies to the best of their abilities. Following surgery, patients will be required to follow a strict reintroduction diet, allowing your body the time it needs to adapt.

This is not a full list of requirements for weight loss surgery candidates. It is intended to be an educational resource, used to give a general idea of how bariatric patients are evaluated and deemed successful candidates for a procedure. 

To View Our Online Bariatric Seminar,
Click Here

Patients with a significantly high BMI (body mass index) often turn to weight loss (bariatric) surgery as a medical solution. This is a medically-supported way for patients to lose excess body weight; so additional health risks are reduced. Sometimes, bariatric patients are referred for weight loss surgery by another specialist, before they can undergo a different procedure.

There are a number of requirements that patients have to meet in order to be considered a candidate for weight loss surgery. These requirements are in the patient’s best interest – to make sure they will be a successful weight loss surgery candidate.

In the event that a patient is not approved for bariatric surgery, the Sisters Metabolic Center for Wellness still has resources available for patients who could benefit from medically-supported weight loss.

 

Understanding the Factors Considered for Weight Loss Surgery

1

BMI

To be a candidate for weight loss surgery, a patient must have a BMI of 40 or greater, or a BMI over 35 accompanied by an obesity-related illness or physical impairment.

BMI is a value calculated based on your height and weight. You can calculate BMI on your own using this tool provided by the CDC.

2

Related health complications

Patients with a slightly lower BMI may still be considered for surgery if their obesity is affecting other aspects of their health. Related problems could include, but are not limited to, diabetes, heart disease, osteoarthritis, and sleep apnea.

 

To View Our Online Bariatric Seminar, Click Here

3

Approval from primary care doctor

In an ideal doctor-patient relationship, your primary care provider has a good picture of your overall health. He or she may have referred you to specialists for specific health issues. This is why many insurance companies ask for a primary care doctor’s sign off on a medical weight loss procedure.

This can create a barrier for patients who may not have seen a doctor in recent years, or may not even have one. Our office staff is here to help make sure patients meet their insurance requirements.

4

Smoking cessation

If you’re a smoker, you’ll need to stop using tobacco products — in most cases, for eight weeks before surgery. Quitting prior to surgery sets patients up with a habit they’ll need to maintain for a healthy lifestyle. Tobacco use after surgery can also put unnecessary strain on your “new” stomach.

5

Motivation to make positive changes

Lastly, a successful weight loss journey requires the patient’s own buy-in. No one is expected to tackle their weight loss journey alone. However, this process asks the patient to make a commitment to themselves and their health.

Patients will be asked to follow specific lifestyle modifications leading up to their procedure, in order to prepare their bodies to the best of their abilities. Following surgery, patients will be required to follow a strict reintroduction diet, allowing your body the time it needs to adapt.

This is not a full list of requirements for weight loss surgery candidates. It is intended to be an educational resource, used to give a general idea of how bariatric patients are evaluated and deemed successful candidates for a procedure.