The foods you eat may lower your risk for heart disease. Why not add some of these to your diet?

Eating a nutrient-rich diet low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium and filled with vegetables, fruit, whole grains and fish can help lower your risk for heart disease. When choosing foods to boost heart health, consider these foods:

1

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Eat foods high in omega-3 fatty acids. Commonly found in fish such as wild salmon and tuna, omega-3 fatty acids help reduce inflammation, which is a precursor to heart disease. If you don’t enjoy fish or are a vegetarian, try adding flaxseeds or walnuts to your diet.

2

Go nuts

Go nuts. Nuts provide protein, folic acid, niacin, magnesium, selenium, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids and other important vitamins and minerals, and they may help reduce your risk of heart disease. Walnuts and almonds are especially heart-healthy. Limit portions to one handful per day because nuts are calorie-dense.

To Find A Heart Specialist Near You Call
(716) 706-2113

3

“Super-Foods”

Stock up on “super foods.” Foods such as oats, broccoli, blueberries and wild salmon have all been shown to have health benefits.

4

Produce

Fill your plate with produce. Fruits and vegetables contain an assortment of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fiber, helping to keep your heart healthy. Fill at least half of your plate with produce at each meal.

5

Chocolate

Satisfy your sweet tooth. Research shows dark chocolate contains antioxidants that may help prevent cholesterol from sticking to artery walls, reducing your risk of a heart attack or stroke.

Chocolate also contains beneficial flavonoids. Be sure to choose dark chocolate with at least 70% cocoa for maximum health benefits and stick with a 1-ounce portion.

“Focusing on real, natural foods rather than processed or packaged meals and understanding the difference between good fats and bad fats are both very important. Start slowly to reduce added sugar and salt and get the whole family involved!”

Dr. Arif Syed

Cardiologist

6

Right Fat

Pick the right fat. While unsaturated fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated) are beneficial when consumed in moderation, saturated and trans fats are not. Olive oil, nuts and avocados are examples of good fats.

Stay away from trans fats found in vegetable shortening, margarine, crackers, cookies and foods made with partially hydrogenated oils.

Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Copyright indicia (© 2007 – 2017 Baldwin Publishing, Inc.). All rights reserved.

Health eCooking® Trademark indicia (® Health eCooking is a registered trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc.)

No information provided in any recipe and/or other product or service is a substitute for professional medical advice and should not be interpreted as treatment recommendations. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH PROVIDER WITH ANY QUESTIONS REGARDING A MEDICAL CONDITION.

The foods you eat may lower your risk for heart disease. Why not add some of these to your diet?

Eating a nutrient-rich diet low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium and filled with vegetables, fruit, whole grains and fish can help lower your risk for heart disease. When choosing foods to boost heart health, consider these nutrition tips:

1

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Eat foods high in omega-3 fatty acids. Commonly found in fish such as wild salmon and tuna, omega-3 fatty acids help reduce inflammation, which is a precursor to heart disease. If you don’t enjoy fish or are a vegetarian, try adding flaxseeds or walnuts to your diet.

2

Go nuts

Go nuts. Nuts provide protein, folic acid, niacin, magnesium, selenium, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids and other important vitamins and minerals, and they may help reduce your risk of heart disease. Walnuts and almonds are especially heart-healthy. Limit portions to one handful per day because nuts are calorie-dense.

To Find A Heart Specialist Near You Call
(716) 706-2113

To Find A Heart Specialist Near You Call
(716) 706-2113

3

“Super-Foods”

Stock up on “super foods.” Foods such as oats, broccoli, blueberries and wild salmon have all been shown to have health benefits.

4

Produce

Fill your plate with produce. Fruits and vegetables contain an assortment of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fiber, helping to keep your heart healthy. Fill at least half of your plate with produce at each meal.

“Focusing on real, natural foods rather than processed or packaged meals and understanding the difference between good fats and bad fats are both very important. Start slowly to reduce added sugar and salt and get the whole family involved!”

Dr. Arif Syed

Cardiologist

5

Chocolate

Satisfy your sweet tooth. Research shows dark chocolate contains antioxidants that may help prevent cholesterol from sticking to artery walls, reducing your risk of a heart attack or stroke.

Chocolate also contains beneficial flavonoids. Be sure to choose dark chocolate with at least 70% cocoa for maximum health benefits and stick with a 1-ounce portion.

6

Right Fat

Pick the right fat. While unsaturated fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated) are beneficial when consumed in moderation, saturated and trans fats are not. Olive oil, nuts and avocados are examples of good fats.

Stay away from trans fats found in vegetable shortening, margarine, crackers, cookies and foods made with partially hydrogenated oils.

Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Copyright indicia (© 2007 – 2017 Baldwin Publishing, Inc.). All rights reserved.

Health eCooking® Trademark indicia (® Health eCooking is a registered trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc.)

No information provided in any recipe and/or other product or service is a substitute for professional medical advice and should not be interpreted as treatment recommendations. ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF A PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH PROVIDER WITH ANY QUESTIONS REGARDING A MEDICAL CONDITION.